Fruit & Vegetable Diet

.

By putting something of every color on your plate or in your lunch bag, you are more likely to eat the 5 to 9 recommended servings of vegetables and fruit every day.

The more reds, oranges, greens, yellows, and blues you see on the plate, the more health promoting properties you are also getting from your vegetable and fruit choices.

Nutrition research shows that colorful vegetables and fruit contain essential vitamins, minerals, fiber, and phyto-chemicals that your body needs to promote health and help you feel great.

Best Selling Juicing Books for Teens & Young Adults
Are you eating at least five servings of fruits and vegetables a day?... What's a Serving Size?... Here's what the National Cancer Institute recommends as a serving of fruit and vegetables: 1 medium fruit or 1/2 cup of small or cut-up fruit; 3/4 cup (180 milliliters) of 100 percent juice; 1/4 cup dried fruit; 1/2 cup raw non-leafy or cooked vegetables; 1 cup raw leafy vegetables (such as lettuce); 1/2 cup cooked beans or peas (such as lentils, pinto beans, and kidney beans). In selecting your daily intake of fruits and vegetables, the National Cancer Institute recommends choosing: 1- At least one serving of a vitamin A-rich fruit or vegetable a day. 2- At least one serving of a vitamin C-rich fruit or vegetable a day. 3- At least one serving of a high-fiber fruit or vegetable a day. 4- Several servings of cruciferous vegetables a week… Remember, The National Academy of Sciences suggest that the nutritional goodness of fruits and vegetables, with a diet that is low in fat, saturated fat and cholesterol and that contains plenty of whole-grain breads and cereals, may decrease the risk of heart disease and cancer...

Reds

When you add deep reds or bright pinks to your daily diet, you are also adding a powerful antioxidant called lycopene.

Lycopene is found in tomatoes, red and pink grapefruit, watermelon, papaya and guava. Diets rich in lycopene are being studied for their ability to fight heart disease and some cancers.

Greens

Do you know why this color is so essential to your diet? Green vegetables are rich in the phytochemicals that keep you healthy.

For example, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin that are found in spinach, collards, kale and broccoli have antioxidant properties and are being studied for their ability to protect your eyes by keeping your retina strong.

Oranges

Orange color is a must have in your daily diet. Orange vegetables and fruits like sweet potatoes, mangos, carrots, and apricots, contain beta-carotene.

This carotenoid is a natural antioxidant that is being studied for its role in enhancing the immune system.

Yellows

Bright yellows have many of the same perks as the orange groups: high in essential vitamins and carotenoids.

Pineapple, for example, is rich with Vitamin C, manganese, and the natural enzyme, bromelain. Bromelain is great to add to a meal to aid in digestion and reduce bloating.

Blues

Blues and purples not only add beautiful shades of tranquility and richness to your plate, they add health-enhancing flavonoids, phytochemicals, and antioxidants.

Blueberries, in particular, are rich in Vitamin C and folic acid and high in fiber and potassium.

Whites

Vegetables from the onion family, which include garlic, chives, scallions, leeks, and any variety of onion, contain the phytochemical allicin which may help lower cholesterol and blood pressure and increase the body’s ability to fight infections.

Best Selling Juicing Books for Teens & Young Adults
Are you eating at least five servings of fruits and vegetables a day?... What's a Serving Size?... Here's what the National Cancer Institute recommends as a serving of fruit and vegetables: 1 medium fruit or 1/2 cup of small or cut-up fruit; 3/4 cup (180 milliliters) of 100 percent juice; 1/4 cup dried fruit; 1/2 cup raw non-leafy or cooked vegetables; 1 cup raw leafy vegetables (such as lettuce); 1/2 cup cooked beans or peas (such as lentils, pinto beans, and kidney beans). In selecting your daily intake of fruits and vegetables, the National Cancer Institute recommends choosing: 1- At least one serving of a vitamin A-rich fruit or vegetable a day. 2- At least one serving of a vitamin C-rich fruit or vegetable a day. 3- At least one serving of a high-fiber fruit or vegetable a day. 4- Several servings of cruciferous vegetables a week… Remember, The National Academy of Sciences suggest that the nutritional goodness of fruits and vegetables, with a diet that is low in fat, saturated fat and cholesterol and that contains plenty of whole-grain breads and cereals, may decrease the risk of heart disease and cancer...

Fruit & Vegetable Diet